Wednesday, July 7, 2010

The year of the Chevaliers



Here is a nice example of a popular flask that was pulled from Northern California's soil not too long ago. Including this recent find, there now exist twenty-two Castle flasks in collectors hands.


14 comments:

  1. stellar find bro. nothing like a DUG bottle. way to go !

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  2. Cheya man ... I heard it was a trifecta event for one of the diggers !

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  3. nice to see a dug bottle, all those recently bought bottles were getting boring. this looks like a solid example, but i heard there are a few greeny ones out there.

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  4. instant boner from this one....

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  5. Who's this anonymous guy getting boners over bottles? Sort of wish he would identify himself so I can make sure he's not standing behind me at the next bottle show! :-)

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  6. best flask to come out since the green N Grange. SF doesn't have bitters, but it sure kicks out the flasks. congrats boys !

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  7. Killer Castle! The last GREEN Grange was dug 22 yrs ago, surely something else interesting has turned up since then.

    Sorry, but there are far too many "anonymous" posters these days. If you are embarrassed to use your given name, it's time to move on.

    Mike Dolcini

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  8. Sacs National EnquirerJuly 8, 2010 at 2:06 PM

    as for the grange green grange dug in sac, there is much controversty over who found the hole and who pulled out the bottle. it's be nice to set the facts straight. OC, what do you know about the dig, how did it go down? as I heard, one digger got the permission, and the other found the pit and pulled out the flask ????

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  9. OC, do you have any pics of that dig or the bottle ? Would be a cool post for sure !

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  10. OK, let's set the record straight for the "umpteenth" time. I found the pit, obtained permission to dig it, and was driving away from home when AT pulled up. Being a open kind of digger, I asked him if he wanted to accompany me and dig the pit. No big deal, as far as I was concerned. The pit was shallow, and from the beginning proved to be solid 1880s. Not a bunch of interesting bottles turned up for the first few feet, but that changed when I turned up a broken green Grange flask that had been the victim of a horseshoe contact. That bottle is still floating around somewhere. not long after that sharded example was brought to light another one showed up. This one was laying close to the bottom of the 4' pit, face up, and had egg shells stuck to it. I told Anthony that another Grange was appearing and he immediately went into a nearly hyperventilating state. I only wish that digital cams had been available at the time. Of course there wasn't a camera to record this event. AT was leaning over the hole, breathing like a steam engine, while I extracted the bottle. Holy sh*t, it appeared mint! Needless to say, the pit was finished, filled in, and we escaped back to my house. It was a rather warm August afternoon, so after unwrapping the flask from the shirt it was rolled up in I used the hose to blow out the dirt inside. Yep, that's 100% correct, the sprayer on the hose blew out the dirt in nothing flat. The rest, as they say, is history.

    If a further discussion is necessary, talk to me at Reno.

    Mike Dolcini

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  11. I've dug several broken examples of the red-colored Chevalier Whiskey Merhcants ffiths and a broken Clear Chevalier toolie fifth, but those are still a far cry from the beautiful cousin, flask.

    Looks like a strong example with nice color and lots of crudity! I can't wait to see it in person one day!

    That thing is heavier than a bag of gold ;)

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  12. Sacs National EnquirerJuly 9, 2010 at 2:56 PM

    who cares who pulled out the bottle. all that matters is who PROBED the pit ! Permission getting is important too, but still, it's all about the guy that constantly finds digs AND pits, not bottles.

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  13. I currently have 7 pits probed out and awaiting the golden words, "go ahead". None of these properties have seen a digger and all are in a "juicy" neighborhood. 6 of them will probably contain junk, but we only need 1 to score.

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  14. I heard that green Grange dug in Sacto sold for a record price. Must've been sweet cashing that one in !
    Andy

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